CARE FOR THE LAMBS

And anyone who welcomes a little child like this on my behalf is welcoming me. But if you cause one of these little ones who trusts in me to fall into sin, it would be better for you to have a large millstone tied around your neck and be drowned in the depths of the sea. [Matthew 18:5-6 (NLT)]

tiger swallowtailEarlier this week, the news broke that church leaders in six Pennsylvania Roman Catholic dioceses have protected more than 300 “predator priests.” More concerned with protecting the church and abusers than helping the more than 1,000 victims or preventing further abuse, they failed to report allegations, discouraged victims from reporting abusers, conducted their own biased and faulty inquiries, pressured law enforcement to delay or close investigations, and spun their own versions of the events. Earlier this summer, the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis agreed to a $210 million settlement to 450 victims of clergy sexual abuse there. It’s not just the Roman Catholic Church that has failed in this arena. It was just revealed that Willow Creek, a non-denominational Protestant mega-church, paid $3.25 million to settle two lawsuits over sex abuse by a church volunteer. No amount of money, however, can remove the trauma of abuse.

This is neither a Catholic nor a Protestant problem; it is everyone’s problem and it certainly is not limited to churches. We’ve seen institution after institution put reputation before serving and protecting our children. A growing number of Olympic athletes have joined the U.S. women’s gymnastics team in allegations of sexual abuse in their sports. The Chicago Tribune recently reported that the Chicago Public Schools failed to protect their students from sexual abuse and assault. Among other things, ineffective background checks didn’t protect the children from offenders and abuse was not reported. Dozens of lawsuits have been filed against the Boy Scouts over sex abuse and they’ve paid out millions of dollars in settlements. Recently, I watched the news in horror as eleven malnourished children (and the remains of a twelfth) were discovered in a New Mexico compound. Earlier this year, a 17-year old escaped from her house of horrors to make the 911 call that rescued her twelve shackled and severely malnourished siblings from their California home. Sadly, these are but a few of the sickening tales of child abuse we find in the news.

If we ever questioned that we live in a fallen world, these horrifying examples leave us no doubt. Child abuse in any form is the work of Satan: the one who came to “steal and kill and destroy.” He is destroying our young people when he steals their innocence, their physical health, their emotional well-being or takes their lives. Made in God’s image, children are not meant to be used and abused; they are meant to be nurtured and loved.

Whether or not we know those who’ve been hurt and abused, they all are our children and this is our problem. As Christ’s body on earth, we must open our eyes to the children around us and never be silent bystanders. As His body, we can’t stand idly by when abuse of any kind is suspected and the church must never hide the ugly truth even when it occurs within our walls. Abuse can’t be swept under the rug nor can we send offenders off to another parish, school, gym, or scout troop with little more than a rap on the knuckles. Moreover, untrained in forensic interview techniques, we are not the ones to conduct internal investigations. Neither judge nor jury, it’s not our job to determine the validity of an accusation; abuse is both a sin and a crime and our job is to report suspected crimes! We have a God-ordained responsibility to protect and preserve all children (not just the ones in our homes).

We all are called to be shepherds. Father in Heaven, show us how to protect your lambs.

Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God. [1 Peter 5:2 (NLT)]

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