HIS PEDAGOGY

Dear brothers and sisters, when troubles of any kind come your way, consider it an opportunity for great joy. For you know that when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be perfect and complete, needing nothing. [James 1:2-4 (NLT)]

pink hibiscus

“May the Holy Spirit give us grace to not begrudge the pedagogy of God,” wrote John Piper. Pedagogy being a somewhat archaic word, I was unsure what Piper meant. Associating pedagogy with an old, boring, stodgy, and authoritarian teacher, I thought it wise to consult the dictionary. “Pedagogy” comes from two Greek words: pais, meaning child, and agogos, meaning leader. A paidagogos was a slave who led the boys to and from school, taught them manners, and tutored them after school. “Pedagogy” eventually came to mean the method and practice of teaching and “pedagogue” to mean teacher. While God is neither boring nor stodgy, He is older than time and an authoritarian (but loving) teacher with some unique, innovative and often challenging teaching methods or pedagogy.

I don’t know about boys in ancient Greece, but I imagine they were like boys today: often less than enthusiastic about learning their lessons, spending time in a classroom, and being taught restraint, civility, and good behavior. Like schoolboys, we are often less than enthusiastic about learning the lessons God is teaching us. Sometimes life seems bizarre or unreasonable and other times it’s downright difficult or heartbreaking; almost all of the time it’s hard to understand. It’s easy to begrudge the way God teaches us.

I think of a scene from the movie Peggy Sue Got Married in which the middle-aged Peggy Sue goes back in time to high school. When asked to solve a problem in algebra class, she responds, “I happen to know that, in the future, I will not have the slightest use for algebra, and I speak from experience.” I agree with Peggy Sue—once out of school, I had no need to know about coefficients, variables, constants or exponents. But, I didn’t know that when I took freshman algebra more than half a century ago.

We are finite beings and can only see what is right before us. God, however, is infinite and can see far into our future both here and in the hereafter. When He teaches us lessons about patience, humility, loss, conflict resolution, pain, worry, pride, fear, trust, obedience, persistence, and faith, we rarely know for what purpose we’re in His schoolroom or when we’re going to need the skill we’re being taught. God’s pedagogy only makes sense when we look back in time. It is then that we realize the benefit we’ve gained from His extraordinary and often bizarre teaching methods. Indeed, as John Piper said, “May the Holy Spirit give us grace to not begrudge the pedagogy of God.”

I never had a trial I wanted to have, but I never had trial I wasn’t glad I had. [Jack Hyles]

My suffering was good for me, for it taught me to pay attention to your decrees. Your instructions are more valuable to me than millions in gold and silver. You made me; you created me. Now give me the sense to follow your commands. [Psalm 119:71-73 (NLT)]

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